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Charlton Kings Infants' School

SEN Information Report/School Offer

September 2018

Introduction

A duty in the SEN Code of Practice was placed on Local Authorities from September 2014 to 'offer' information for parents, in a single place, which helps them to understand what services they and their family can expect from a range of local agencies - including their statutory entitlements; and make clear what is available for their child from early years settings, schools (including Academies and Free Schools), colleges and other services, and also including health and social care.  All information within the Local Offer section is here to support families of children and Young People with Special Educational Needs and/or a disability (SEND) from 0 to 25.  Details of the latest Gloucestershire Local Offer can be found at

http://www.glosfamiliesdirectory.org.uk/kb5/gloucs/glosfamilies/localoffer.page

The document which follows is Charlton Kings Infants’ SEN Information Report which details the provision our school is currently able to offer to children with SEND.   You may also hear it referred to as a “School Offer”.  Specific information can be found in the sections detailed in the contents below.  Charlton Kings Infants’ School follows guidance from the local authority regarding following the Early Help Pathway to support the educational and social care needs of children and their families.

Contents

  •  

How does our school know/identify that children have special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND)?

  •  

What are the first steps our school will take if special educational needs are identified?

  •  

What should parents/carers do if they think their child has SEND? How can they raise concerns?

  •  

How will our school include parents and students in planning support?

  •  

How will our school teach and support children with SEND?

  •  

Who will be working with your child? 

  •  

How does our school ensure that the information about a child’s SEND or EHC plan is shared and understood by teachers and all relevant staff who come into contact with that child?

  •  

What role does the class teacher play?

  •  

What expertise does our school staff have in relation to SEND?

  •  

What intervention programmes does our school run for children with SEND and how are they delivered? 

  •  

What support does our school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behaviour expectations and how do we support children to avoid exclusion?

  •  

Which services do we use to provide for and support our pupils?

  •  

How does our school provide support to improve the emotional and social developments of our SEND pupils?

  •  

How does our school manage the administration of medicines?

  •  

How does our school help with personal care where this is needed?

  1.  

What is our policy on day trips, school outings, health and safety arrangements?

  •  

What extra pastoral support do we offer and what pastoral support arrangements are in place to listen to pupils with SEND?

  •  

What access do our pupils have to facilities and extra-curricular activities available to all children?

  •  

How will parents/carers know how well their child is doing?

  •  

How does the school measure outcomes and the impact of support provided to the pupil?

  •  

When and at what interval will this happen?

  •  

Who will explain and discuss this with young people?

  •  

How do we assess and evaluate the provision we have arranged for your child

  •  

How do we prepare our school and support SEND pupils/students and how do we arrange and support a transfer to another school or educational establishment?

  •  

How do we prepare our pupils for adult life and independent living?

  •  

What special arrangements are made for examinations/assessments?

  •  

What resources and equipment are available for pupils with SEND?

  •  

How accessible is our school to pupils/students with SEND?

  •  

Where can you find our SEND policy?

  •  

What role do the governors have? What does our SEND governor do?

  •  

What can you do if you are not happy?

  •  

How can parents/carers arrange a visit to our school?

  •  

Who can you contact for more information?

  •  

When was the above information updated?

  • How does our school know/identify that children have special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND)?

Some children will enter school with a diagnosis of some form of SEND already in place.  In those instances, staff will liaise with the child’s parents/carers and other professionals from pre-school settings or previous schools and other agencies, (for example, paediatricians, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists) in order to gain an understanding of the exact nature of the child’s need before they enter school.  

For all other pupils, the staff at CKIS monitors the learning of each child very closely.  Early identification of needs is key to providing appropriate intervention in order to help the child progress more quickly.  If a child is finding it difficult to achieve at age-expected levels or if progress within a specific area of learning is not as rapid as we would expect, the class teacher will speak with the SENDCo (SEND Co-ordinator) to consider whether or not the child might have SEND.  The table below details some of the assessment opportunities we use to monitor progress and identify people with specific SEND.

 

 

Sources of evidence

 

YR

Y1

 

Y2

 

Assessment against Early Years Outcomes

 

 

 

EYFS profile results

 

 

 

YR baseline assessments

 

 

 

Phonics/common exception word recognition assessments

 

 

 

Intervention monitoring

 

 

 

3X annually progress tests (Maths & English)

 

 

 

Reviewed support plan (My Plan/My Plan+) targets

 

 

 

Intervention map: records interventions each pupil has been involved in.

 

 

 

 
  • What are the first steps our school will take if special educational needs are identified?

If a class teacher suspects that a child has special educational needs, they will speak with parents/carers to inform them of their concerns.  The SENDCo will also be informed and will be able to offer advice to the class teacher about the kind of intervention that may be appropriate to support the child in their learning.  The SENDCo is available to discuss the child’s additional needs with parents/carers if they wish. 

A child with SEND will have a specially written plan – “My Support Plan” which outlines the nature of the child’s need, the desirable outcomes for the child – what we would like them to be able to achieve – along with the strategies and resources that will be used to help them reach their goal.  This plan is written by the class teacher in close consultation with the parents/carers and when appropriate, the child.   The My Plan is the first stage of a single graduated pathway of support as recommended in the new SEND Code of Practice. 

  • What should parents/carers do if they think their child has SEND? How can they raise concerns?

If parents/carers think their child may have SEND, they should speak to their child’s class teacher in the first instance.  The teacher will usually be available to see parents/carers after school but if this is not possible, they will be able to arrange an appointment. 

If the child has yet to start at CKIS, parents/carers should please contact the SENDCo, Mrs Jones, if they wish to discuss their child’s needs.  She can be contacted by phone at the school (01242 514483) or by email: senco@charltonkings-inf.gloucs.sch.uk

  • How will our school include parents and students in planning support?

When a child has additional needs identified, a plan will be put in place to help the child work towards outcomes which have been agreed by the class teacher, parents/carers and pupils. Parents/carers will be informed at regular reviews of their child’s progress against the agreed outcomes.   Wherever possible, the child’s views about the additional provision they receive will be sought and included in the child’s support plan (My Plan/My Plan+)/EHC plan.                                                                     

Where advice needs to be sought from other professionals, parents/carers are invited to submit their views as part of the referral process. 

  • How will our school teach and support children with SEND?
  • For children without an Education, Health and Social Care plan( EHC)

The biggest influence on a child’s achievement in mainstream schools is the quality of the teaching in the classroom.  We pride ourselves on quality teaching of all pupils at CKIS with tasks matched to the needs of pupils of all abilities.  Class teachers will plan activities which are matched to your child’s needs within the curriculum we follow at CKIS.  Pupils with SEND may engage in intervention programmes which are selected to meet the child’s area of need. The details of the provision will be in a “My Plan” format.  Intervention programmes are usually delivered by experienced and qualified teaching partners (TPs) and are monitored for effectiveness by the SENDCo. 

Where children have more severe degrees of SEND, or if children are not making expected progress, despite initial intervention, the advice of other professionals (Educational Psychologists, Occupational Therapists, Speech and Language Therapists, Advisory Teachers who are specialists in specific areas of SEND) may be sought.  In this case, the child will progress along the single graduated pathway of support and their My Plan will become My Plan+.  Following visits from other professionals, the school will seek to implement their recommendations in order to best meet the needs of the child.  This may be in the form of different forms of intervention or suggestions for appropriate resources which would be of benefit to the child. 

Progress against the desirable outcomes agreed in the support plan (My Plan/My Plan+) will be monitored closely by  the class teacher, Teaching Partner and SENDCo and parents/carers will be invited in to school to discuss their child’s progress at least four times a year, (usually in October, January, April and July). 

If a child with a support plan (My Plan+) does not make expected progress then a decision to advance further along the single graduated pathway of support may be taken in agreement with parents/carers and other professionals.  In this case we would pursue an application for an EHC plan (Education, Health and Social Care plan).  Details of this follow in the next section.

  • For children with an Education, Health and Social Care plan( EHC

The same principles apply to children with an EHC plan as all children and, as outlined above, the school feels that the biggest influence on a child’s achievement in mainstream schools is the quality of the teaching in the classroom. In addition to this, children with an EHC plan will have a formal plan outlining the nature of their needs and the additional level of support and resources they should have access to in order to make progress against the child’s desirable outcomes. The Local Authority provides the additional funding identified as necessary to deliver provision in order to meet a child’s outcomes. 

A parent has the right to request a personal budget in order to secure provision to meet identified outcomes in a child’s plan. If a personal budget is requested by a parent this must be agreed by the Local Authority. If a parent requests a personal budget in the form of a direct payment, any provision that is to be delivered in school must be agreed by the Head Teacher also.

Parents/carers will be invited in to school to discuss their child’s progress at least four times a year, (usually in October, January, April and July).  There will also be an annual review of the EHC when the provision and support the child receives will be discussed by all professionals involved with the child and submitted to the local authority in order to agree an appropriate plan for the following year.

Depending upon the nature and level of need, it may be appropriate for a child with an EHC plan to follow a specially modified curriculum which is matched to the child’s level of development. Pupils with an EHC plan will remain as part of the mainstream class but may sometimes need to work on tasks which have been planned for them on an individual basis.  

  • How does our school plan the support?  How are resources allocated and matched to needs?

Pupils with similar needs often work in intervention groups together.  The staff from the reception classes identify children who have needs in different areas and support is delivered through small group and/or one to one support with staff who have specific areas of expertise.  The same happens within Years 1 and 2.  Resources are usually year group specific but can be used by all pupils across the school if they meet the child’s needs. 

  • How is the decision made about the support your child will receive?

Pupils’ identified needs and their progress against the outcomes agreed by the class teacher and parents/carers/guardians are used to decide upon appropriate intervention strategies and resources which will be used with the child.  The SENDCo is often part of this process.

For children with an EHC plan, decisions on funding for provision will be made by the SEND Casework Team at the Local Authority; they base their decision on the evidence presented to them by the SENDCo.  This evidence will be in the form of reports from other professionals, reviewed support plan (My Plan+) documents and any other supporting documents it would be appropriate to submit. 

  • Who will be working with your child?  (Assessing, reviewing, overseeing arrangements, working towards outcomes, including looked after children)

At CKIS, the person with direct responsibility for provision for a child with SEND is the child’s class teacher.  They will be the first point of contact for parents/carers and it is usually the class teacher who identifies needs in specific areas of learning.  They do this through routine assessments or by undertaking specific assessments when they feel a child is not making specific progress.  The Teaching Partner (TP) working in the classroom will also be part of this process as they may by working closely with the child on specific areas of learning.  The class teacher will arrange reviews of the child’s plan with parents/carers.  The TP working in the child’s class may also be present at these reviews;  the SENDCo will also attend when necessary – if further advice needs to be sought or if the child is not making expected progress and there is a case for advancing along the single graduated pathway of provision.

Intervention programmes are often delivered by experienced, qualified TPs (some of whom are qualified teachers); the outcomes of these programmes are monitored by the SENDCo. 

For pupils with more complex needs at My Plan+ on the Early Help Pathway or who have an EHC plan, professionals with specific specialisms may be involved, either to deliver intervention directly or to advise CKIS staff on provision.  These professionals will be engaged with the permission of the child’s parents/carers/guardians.

  • How does our school ensure that the information about a child’s SEND or EHC plan is shared and understood by teachers and all relevant staff who come into contact with that child?                           

    The class teacher will have a good understanding about any plan in place for a pupil as they will have been closely involved in the writing of any plans, this is also the case for other staff members who regularly work with a pupil, for example their TP. The class teacher and SENDCo will ensure that any plans in place for a child are shared with other staff working with that child. Any elements of the plan which is unclear to other members of staff will be explained by the class teacher.  The class teacher will also arrange a review meeting with the child’s parents/carers to discuss the contents of the plan or EHC.   In the case of pupils with an EHC plan, the SENDCo will arrange a formal annual review to plan future provision and will invite all professionals who work with the child to attend.

  • What role does the class teacher play?

    The class teacher writes the support plan (My Plan/My Plan+) and is responsible for sharing the plan with other members of staff who work with the child and the child’s parents/carers.  At a given point or before if the child has achieved their desirable outcome, the class teacher will arrange to meet with parents/carers to discuss the child’s progress and plan next steps.  The class teacher copies the child’s reviewed plan and ensures that the SENDCo is aware of the progress made by the pupil. 

  • What expertise does our school staff have in relation to SEND?

Mrs Jones is the SENDCo and has been teaching in mainstream schools in different authorities since 1995.  She was appointed SENDCo at CKIS in 2009 and has completed a master’s level certificate in Special Educational Needs.  She works closely with professionals from other agencies to ensure the best possible outcomes for pupils with SEND.  She attends SENDCo Conferences arranged by the Local Authority and has also completed SENDCo training relating to the SEND Code of Practice.   As SENDCo, she delivers training on different aspects of SEN to teachers and support staff at CKIS.  In the past, she has been involved in the recruitment and selection process for the Local Authority who were interviewing for advisory teachers to support SEND pupils in mainstream settings.

Mrs James, the headteacher, has worked in both mainstream schools and a specialist provision since 1994. She has significant experience in teaching children with a range of complex learning needs and worked as an Advisory Teacher for SEN and EYFS in another Local Authority for ten years. She works in partnership with the SENDCo to ensure that expertise is shared throughout the school.

All teaching staff completed training in identifying and supporting pupils with autism in spring of 2015.  In addition, staff have engaged in extensive training relating to meeting the emotional needs of pupils and understanding how mental health and well-being can impact upon a child’s capacity to learn through training with a specialist in Attachment Disorders.  In addition, Mrs Jones has attended mental health First Aid training and engaged in a course on therapy and listening skills.  All teaching staff and some TPs have received training in delivery of “Mindfulness” sessions. 

We have many experienced and qualified TPs who deliver intervention programmes in our setting.  Two of them are HLTAs (Higher Level Teaching Assistants), one is a qualified teacher and one is a former paediatric physiotherapist.  Some staff received training in the delivery of specific intervention programmes, mainly in the area of developing social skills and “Fizzy” – a programme designed to help pupils with physical co-ordination and social skills difficulties.  All teachers and a number of identified Teaching Partners have also completed Team TEACH (a positive handling approach) to support children with complex behavioural needs. In the past twelve months, two TPs have completed ELSA training so that they can operate as Emotional Literacy Support Assistants in our school.  Two members of staff have attended Talk Boost training enabling them to deliver speech and language intervention to pupils who require support in this area of their development.  Specific support staff are being trained in how to meet the needs of pupils with physical disabilities.  The school has committed to further improving knowledge and understanding of SEND by arranging training for staff through the educational psychology service.  

  • What intervention programmes does our school run for children with SEND and how are they delivered? 

     

Programmes/ strategies

 

Area of Need

 

KDG

YR

Y1

 

Y2

 

PAT (Phonological Awareness Training) group

Literacy/dyslexic tendencies

 

 

 

 

Phonics booster group

Literacy/dyslexic tendencies

 

 

 

 

Dancing Bears

Literacy/dyslexic tendencies

 

 

 

 

Apples and Pears

Literacy/dyslexic tendencies

 

 

 

 

Plus 1

Maths/ dyscalculia tendencies

 

 

 

 

Power of 2

Maths/ dyscalculia tendencies

 

 

 

 

Number intervention group

Maths/ dyscalculia tendencies

 

 

 

 

Social Skills group

Social Interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Visual Timetable/Agenda

Social Interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

“Time-Out”/ Quiet place

Social Interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Solution-Focussed Thinking

Social Interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Fizzy Club – group

Physical co-ordination/ Dyspraxia /Social interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Time to Talk

Social interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Talk Boost

Vocabulary and Expressive Language Acquisition 

 

 

 

 

ELSA

Social interaction/ Emotional and Behavioural

 

 

 

 

Teodorescu Perceptuo Motor Programme

Fine motor control/ Handwriting

 

 

 

 

Coloured overlays/paper

Pupils experiencing visual stress

 

 

 

 

It is not uncommon for parents to explore the possibility that their child’s difficulties in literacy (reading and writing) may be due to Dyslexia. At this early stage in a child’s education, it could be that the difficulties they are experiencing are due to some degree of developmental delay and that with the correct teaching strategies they will make the progress to catch up with their peers.  While a diagnosis of Dyslexia may not be formally made by an Educational Psychologist while your child is at CKIS, children who display dyslexic tendencies are supported at CKIS and engage in programmes specifically designed to help dyslexic pupils.

 

  • What support does our school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behaviour expectations and how do we support children to avoid exclusion?

     

We acknowledge that some children will have difficulty in conforming to the normal routines in our setting and will sometimes struggle to behave appropriately. In these instances, pupils and parents/carers are given support to help the child to regulate their behaviour. We use a variety of strategies, primarily based on promoting a consistent approach, to help support children so that they can begin to take responsibility for their own behaviour and actions. We believe that it is important to help our pupils develop the skills and strategies to understand what they need to do in order to manage their own behaviours appropriately when they find themselves in challenging situations. The emphasis is on helping the child to develop self-control and self-esteem.

Where necessary the school will access a variety of professionals and services to seek advice and support in meeting the needs of pupils who display challenging behaviours. These professionals may include Advisory Teachers and Educational Psychologists.

The school is committed to avoiding exclusions wherever possible by early identification of issues and providing the necessary support. Please see the school’s behaviour policy for full details about processes around exclusions.

  • Which services do we use to provide for and support our pupils?

Educational Psychology Service: to ascertain the exact nature of a child’s difficulties and for advice about how best to meet a child’s needs within our mainstream setting.  This is a service which we buy into as a school.     

Advisory Teacher Service (ATS)Teachers from the ATS are specialists in their field and come into school to support pupils and staff by advising staff on how to meet the needs of the child using specific resources or intervention programmes.  They also sometimes carry out assessments to ascertain the level of development of the child and to measure the child’s progress since the last assessment date.  There are various strands of the ATST which are detailed below:

 

ATS Team

Who they support

Communication & Interaction

Supporting pupils with severe language impairments or disorders, severe social communication difficulties and those on the Autistic Spectrum.

Cognition & Learning

Supports the inclusion of children and young people who have a range of significant and additional learning difficulties in mainstream schools; including moderate or severe learning difficulties in mainstream school.

Physical Needs

For pupils with a physical disability; support includes in-service training, advice on access to the curriculum and whole school activities. Resource and equipment loans to enable access to the National Curriculum are available.

Emotional & Behaviour

Supports the inclusion of children and young people who have a range of significant emotional and behavioural difficulties.

Visually Impaired

Supporting pupils with a significant level of visual impairment.

Hearing Impaired

Supporting pupils whose primary difficulty is related to hearing and those who have a hearing loss in addition to other disabilities.

 

Speech & Language Therapist (SpLT):   This is a NHS service to which we can refer pupils with a variety of speech and language difficulties.  SpLTs assess pupils who are referred and offer advice in the areas of articulation – speaking clearly – and language acquisition – understanding language and using language to communicate feelings and ideas. 

Occupational Therapist (OT):    This is a NHS service to which we refer pupils with physical needs and also those pupils who may be displaying difficulties with organisation.  There are also OTs who specialise in sensory sensitivity – a difficulty commonly associated with pupils with ASD.

School Nursing Service:    This is a NHS service which comes into school routinely to check the sight and hearing of all Reception pupils.  In addition to this, we can refer pupils if we have concerns about different aspects of their emotional or physical health.  These referrals are made in consultation with parents/carers and can be made at the parents/carers’ request.

Social Services:  We work routinely with staff from Social Services when there is a looked-after child at our school.  We can make referrals to social services or Social Care which is a separate section which offers to support to families who need it in order to operate successfully.

CYPS (Children & Young Peoples’ Service):  We are able to access this NHS service for pupils who may be experiencing some form of mental or emotional health well-being issue.

Early Help: A local authority service which can offer support to families in dealing with the SEND of their children and managing it in the home.

The Virtual School:  A service specialising in advising settings on how to support pupils who are currently in the care of the local authority or who have been adopted from care previously. 

 

  • How does our school provide support to improve the emotional and social developments of our SEND pupils?

    We recognise that children who experience difficulties in different areas of learning are vulnerable to low self-esteem.  We take this aspect of school life very seriously and try very hard to build self-esteem through a broad and balanced curriculum, providing experiences for the children which will help them to discover a talent or area of strength they were previously unaware of.  This may be in the arts or sport; CKIS has an enriched curriculum with substantial amounts of the timetable given over to music, art and PE.  We also seek opportunities to use the outdoor area in school and further afield with pupils engaging in Forest School activities to build team-work and confidence.  The PSHE curriculum provides opportunities for all pupils to gain self-awareness and an understanding of the feelings of others.  Our ELSA trained TPs run targeted intervention programmes to meet the needs of identified individuals and groups of children.

    Key Stage 1 pupils assume the role of “Playground Friends” and offer supervised support to pupils at lunchtime play.

    CKIS has an Anti-bullying Policy but we consider ourselves fortunate that the children we have here are on the whole thoughtful and considerate and understand that some children have additional or different needs to them. 

  • How does our school manage the administration of medicines?

    Health care plans will be drawn up which identify the nature of the medical condition and how the school can help to meet those needs.  They will specify who has responsibility for meeting those needs.  If a child has a medical condition, parents/carers should inform their class teacher or the school secretary.   This policy is available on the school website.

  • How does our school help with personal care where this is needed?

    Staff at CKIS assist children in this area as required so long as they are fully aware of the need and trained to meet that need. CKIS has an Intimate Care policy which is available on our school website.

  • What is our policy on day trips, school outings, health and safety arrangements?

Risk assessments are carried out routinely for all activities off the school site.  Where a child who has specific SEND is due to participate in an activity, this will be detailed in the risk assessment which is submitted to the head teacher for approval.  The main way we minimise risks is by always ensuring we have an appropriate number of adults supervising the activity.

  • What extra pastoral support do we offer and what pastoral support arrangements are in place to listen to pupils with SEND?

    All staff at CKIS are aware of pupils with SEND and make appropriate provision to meet their emotional and social needs.  Very often, SEND pupils form strong bonds with teaching partners or midday supervisors working in their classroom and know that they have this point of contact on the playground at lunchtime or at break.  

    We do not at present engage the services of a counsellor although we have plans to train a TP in this area.

  • What access do our pupils have to facilities and extra-curricular activities available to all children?

    Pupils in Year 2 have the opportunity to engage in a range of extra-curricular activities; all pupils submit their wish-list at the start of the year and places in clubs are allocated.  In the past, SEND children have been able to access these activities however, parents/carers need to be aware that their child will not usually be supported to the same degree in these activities as they are in the classroom.  

  • How will parents/carers know how well their child is doing?

    The school holds two parents evenings annually where as parents you have the opportunity to ask questions how your child is doing and receive feedback from your child’s class teacher. This is an opportunity to ask questions about all aspects of your child’s life here at school and does not have to be specifically about their SEND.

    We encourage good communication between our parents and school staff and so if, as a parent, you have any concerns we would encourage you to see your child’s class teacher at the end of the school day, or by making an appointment if necessary. There is no need to wait until a formal review or a parents evening.

    The child’s class teacher will arrange additional support plan (My Plan/My Plan+) review meetings.  Where a child has an EHC plan, the SENDCo will arrange the formal annual review and invite all professionals involved in supporting the child.  These formal meetings will give parents a chance to discuss specific issues with regards to their child’s SEND.

  • How does the school measure outcomes and the impact of support provided to the pupil?

    When the child’s support plan (My Plan/My Plan+) is written by the teacher, the desirable outcomes will be set down and at the review point, the class teacher will tell parents/carers whether or not the intervention has been successful.  The SENDCo will also monitor the success of support against the agreed outcomes of the child and other assessment data.

    Where a child has an EHC plan the success of outcomes and the impact of support provided will be discussed at least annually at the formal review although can be discussed earlier, in a more informal meeting, if appropriate.

    All teachers track progress routinely throughout the year as detailed earlier in this document and this will continue to be the case for pupils with SEND.

  • When and at what interval will this happen?

    Support plans (My Plan/My Plan+) will usually be reviewed four times a year; the schedule for this is currently October, January, April and July although there are sometimes occasions when these timescales change, for example, if a child has met the targets agreed at the last review meeting, it would be appropriate to set new ones before the planned review date.

    EHC plans must be reviewed at least once, annually, with all professionals involved with your child invited.

  • Who will explain and discuss this with young people?

    The child’s class teacher or a teaching partner working with the child will usually explain the outcomes to the child and also, elicit the child’s views regarding their learning. It is also appropriate for parents/carers to be part of this process and to discuss their child’s learning with them.

    Pupils will be involved as fully as possible in their reviews, ensuring they are part of the process and planning, their voice is heard and they have the opportunity to contribute towards their finalised plan.

  • How do we assess and evaluate the provision we have arranged for your child?

    We monitor the outcomes of the support plan (My Plan/My Plan+/EHC plan) once they have been reviewed.  The SENDCo also tracks the child’s attainment in other assessments to ascertain if progress is being sustained.  This is detailed in section 1.

  • How do we prepare and support SEND pupils/students and how do we arrange and support a transfer to another school or educational establishment?

    When a child with SEND joins us at CKIS, we try to ensure that their entry to school is a positive experience for them and their parents/carers.  Visits to CKIS are encouraged so that the child is familiar with the school setting and the staff they will be working with.  Staff from CKIS liaise with professionals already working with the child to ensure that they are fully aware of the nature and degree of the child’s difficulties.  Reception teachers visit our feeder settings to observe the children in a familiar environment and all families are invited to book a home visit as part of our induction process by the class teacher and TP.  All staff who will be working with a child with SEND will be informed of the child’s needs so that they are able to respond appropriately when the child joins us. 

    If the child is joining us in reception, we sometimes advocate part-time attendance to help smooth the transition from pre-school to CKIS.  This is something that parents/carers will need to discuss with the child’s teacher or the head teacher We will also prepare a booklet for the child to share with parents/carers at home which helps the child to become more familiar and comfortable with the routines and organisation of the setting.  

    A booklet of the same kind is produced when a child moves to a new class or to the junior school.  If a child is joining us from another school in Year 1 or Year 2, we encourage taster visits and will also send home a book for them to share with parents/carers. 

    When a child with SEND is nearing the end of Year 2 and transferring to Charlton Kings Junior School (CKJS), we work with our Key Stage 2 colleagues to arrange extra visits to their new school if we feel this would be beneficial to them.   Prior to this, the SENDCo from CKIS meets with her junior school counterpart to inform her of the needs of pupils with SEND transferring to their setting. When it is the annual review of a child in Year 1 with an EHC plan whose parents/carers have expressed a desire for the child to transfer to CKJS, the SENDCo from CKJS will be invited to attend that meeting.   Staff at both schools work closely together to ensure that planning for transfer to KS2 facilitates a smooth transition for children and their families.  The SENDCos and Head teachers meet regularly to discuss issues relating to provision for children transferring to CKJS.  The SEN report for CKJS can be found on their website:  www.ckjs.org.uk

    Similar arrangements will be made for pupils transferring to other settings other than CKJS in accordance with the new school’s school offer.

  • How do we prepare our pupils for adult life and independent living?

    The plans detailing provision for SEND children all detail short term desirable outcomes but ultimately, there are long term desirable outcomes for children relating to their adult life. This is a long way off for the children attending CKIS but we believe we can contribute to these long-term goals by helping the pupils here to gain confidence and self-esteem, equipping them with basic skills which will enable them to be more independent as they grow older. 

  • What special arrangements are made for examinations/assessments?

    Most pupils with SEND are able to access the same assessments as their peers with minimal support.  For some pupils, these exercises are inappropriate and in these instances, the children are disapplied from assessment.  This means that they do not undertake the assessment activity.  Most pupils in Year 1 and 2 at CKIS achieve at age expected standards.  Some pupils have not yet reached that stage in their learning and their attainment is measured against P Scales.

  • What resources and equipment are available for pupils with SEND?

CKIS responds to the needs of the children at the school at any given time.  We are fortunate that in the past, we have been able to purchase specific equipment for pupils with SEND when they have joined us, for example, a sloped writing board to support pupils with physical difficulties.  We have a wide range of technological resources, such as iPads, so that pupils with SEND are able to access the curriculum in a range of media. 

  • How accessible is our school to pupils/students with SEND?

    All classrooms at CKIS are on the ground floor with ramps or sloping floors where there are steps to different levels.  There are disabled toilets in the main school building and a purpose built wet room with a hoist in the old school building.   

  • Where can you find our SEND policy?

    Our SEND Policy is published on our school website.  The current policy is on the CKIS website, in the section “Parental Information”, “Policies”.  ( http://www.ckis.org.uk/ )

  • What role do the governors have? What do our SEND governors do?

    The SENDCO reports to the full governing body about the provision made for pupils with SEND at CKIS. The named SEND governor is Mrs Rebecca Pritchard – a qualified Educational Psychologist and lecturer in education at The University of Gloucestershire.   She meets with the SENDCo regularly to ensure that she is fully informed about the issues relating to SEND provision and to monitor the support given to SEND and other vulnerable pupils (including Looked After Children and Pupils in receipt of the Pupil Premium Grant) at CKIS. The named governor has attended local authority training in this aspect of education governance and feeds back their findings from monitoring visits to the full Governing Body in order to inform school improvement planning.

  • What can you do if you are not happy? Who to talk to and who to complain to; arrangements made by the governing body

    If parents/carers of a child with SEND are unhappy with any aspect of the provision made for their child, they should speak to the child’s class teacher in the first instance.  The SENDCo and the Head teacher are also happy to listen to your concerns and work towards a resolve. 

    If parents/carers are not satisfied with this response, they should contact the governing body of the school. There is a complaints procedure which is detailed on the school website, again under “Parental Information”. 

  • How can parents/carers arrange a visit to our school? What is involved?

    If you would like to arrange a visit to CKIS to find out if it is the place you would like your child to go to school, please contact the secretary at the school office for an appointment.  Tel: 01242 514483 or email: ckis@charltonkings-inf.gloucs.sch.uk

  • Who can you contact for more information?

    Mrs Jones, SENDCo at CKIS:  senco@charltonkings-inf.gloucs.sch.uk

    Gloucestershire Parent Partnership Services: http://www.glospps.org.uk/

    Independent Parent Special Education Advice: http://www.ipsea.org.uk/

  • When was the above information updated?

    This School Offer was updated and published in October 2018; it will be updated as further training to staff is delivered.